Germs resisting conventional antibiotics Here comes new disinfectant | Urals, Technology & innovation MarchmontNews.com

Urals | Technology & innovation

Germs resisting conventional antibiotics? Here comes new disinfectant

18 Jan '22
Scientists at the Perm Polytechnic University (PNIPU) in the West Urals have come up with a new disinfectant that is believed to be able to successfully counter antibiotic-resistant bacteria.

The target is the staphylococcus family of bacteria that often trigger infections, including those that strike hospitals. Patients with poor immunity are their primary prey.

“Research shows that germs find ways of “fooling” antibiotics and disinfectants used to fight them, thus getting a strong foothold in a body area they’ve occupied. One of their tactics is forming biofilms that have been found to considerably step up the bacteria’s ability to withstand external factors, including the person’s immune response,” said Ivan Pyankov of the research team.

To solve the problem, the Perm scientists have offered a disinfecting solution called SA, an isoquinoline-based synthetic product that also contains hominin, a recently discovered low-molecular-weight cationic peptide of bacterial origin.

The researchers have proven the SA’s manifest bactericidal effect that helps reduce by half the staphylococci’s ability to cling to surrounding surfaces. A combination of the SA and hominin has been found to be particularly strong in thwarting the germs’ resistance to anti-bacterial activity.

According to Mr. Pyankov, “the disinfectant effectively destroys living bacteria, showing its effect almost instantly.”

The new disinfecting solution may be used for efficient treatment of surfaces at clinics and hospitals.